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Surfacing the self-evident in anti-racist pedagogic research: how to ask the wrong people the right questions, and how not to ask the right people anything at all

McLuckie, Connie

Authors



Abstract

Our Strategic Enhancement Project did not generate anything surprising. That doesn’t mean it didn’t generate anything important. It aimed to consider whether using an adapted ‘Decolonising Midwifery: Education Toolkit' (Royal College of Midwives, 2023) could provide insights into cultural competence within our midwifery curricula. We developed two surveys based on the questions provided by the RCM, one for students and one for the midwifery teaching team. For the students, the data yielded by question 4/36, and for the lecturers, that of 6/42 pretty much surfaced the self-evident. No spoilers. Pinar (2004) understands curricula as a ‘complicated conversation’; with Fenwick and Edwards (2010) proposing (through the lens of Actor-Network Theory) that ‘curriculum reforms are themselves complicated in enactments that do not always, or even often, produce what is desired or expected’. Drawing a wee bit from this theoretical palette, this presentation will consider what complicated our research conversations and why.

Citation

McLuckie, C. (2024, June). Surfacing the self-evident in anti-racist pedagogic research: how to ask the wrong people the right questions, and how not to ask the right people anything at all. Paper presented at The Gathering: Edinburgh Napier's Learning & Teaching Conference, Edinburgh, UK

Presentation Conference Type Conference Paper (unpublished)
Conference Name The Gathering: Edinburgh Napier's Learning & Teaching Conference
Start Date Jun 18, 2024
Deposit Date Jun 19, 2024
Peer Reviewed Not Peer Reviewed