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Developing remote exercise support and rehabilitation for patients after spontaneous coronary artery dissection - a feasibility study

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Project Description

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is increasingly recognised as an important cause of myocardial infarction (MI), particularly among younger women and has been linked participating in strenuous physical activity (PA). This can lead to psychological distress, fear and anxiety about exercise, and result in an avoidance of all PA. Support programmes are needed to encourage SCAD survivors to return to PA.

This project will examine 1) wearable fitness tracker recorded PA pre and post SCAD, 2) the feasibility of a remote programme of PA support and 3) whether whether the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation guidance for aerobic exercise and resistance training during cardiac rehabilitation is appropriate for SCAD survivors

Status Project Live
Funder(s) Heart Research UK
Value £176,214.00
Project Dates Apr 1, 2024 - Mar 31, 2026
Partner Organisations University of the West of Scotland



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