Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

Manipulating Foley Footsteps and Character Realism to Influence Audience Perceptions of a 3D Animated Walk Cycle

Cunningham, Stuart; Mcgregor, Iain

Authors

Stuart Cunningham



Abstract

Foley artistry is an essential part of the audio post-production process for film, television, games, and animation. By extension, it is as crucial in emergent media such as virtual, mixed, and augmented reality. Footsteps are a core activity that a Foley artist must undertake and convey information about the characters and environment presented on-screen. This study sought to identify if characteristics of age, gender, weight, health, and confidence could be conveyed, using sounds created by a professional Foley artist, in three different 3D humanoid models, following a single walk cycle. An experiment was conducted with human participants (n=100) and found that Foley manipulations could convey all the intended characteristics with varying degrees of contextual success. It was shown that the abstract models were capable of communicating characteristics of age, gender, and weight. The findings are relevant to researchers and practitioners in linear and interactive media and demonstrate mechanisms by which Foley can contribute useful information and concepts about on-screen characters.

Citation

Cunningham, S., & Mcgregor, I. (in press). Manipulating Foley Footsteps and Character Realism to Influence Audience Perceptions of a 3D Animated Walk Cycle. In Audio Mostly 2022

Conference Name Audio Mostly 2022
Conference Location St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences, Austria
Start Date Sep 6, 2022
End Date Sep 9, 2022
Acceptance Date Jul 26, 2022
Deposit Date Jul 30, 2022
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery
Book Title Audio Mostly 2022
Keywords Applied computing → Sound and music computing; Human- centered computing → User studies, Sound design, Foley, user perceptions, animation, walk cycles
Public URL http://researchrepository.napier.ac.uk/Output/2893330

This file is under embargo due to copyright reasons.

Contact repository@napier.ac.uk to request a copy for personal use.






You might also like



Downloadable Citations