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Gig Economy as a Tool for Sustainable Livelihood Strategy for Construction workers in South Africa

Osunsanmi, T O; Aigbavboa, C O; Oke, A E; Liphadzi, M

Authors

C O Aigbavboa

A E Oke

M Liphadzi



Abstract

The economic meltdown and recession experienced in the country have affected the construction industry negatively in numerous ways. Among them is the shortage of construction work that affects the livelihood of construction workers. Towards improving the livelihood of construction workers this study proposes the adoption of the gig economy as a tool for enhancing their sustainable livelihood strategy. The study's aim was achieved through administering a questionnaire to construction workers in Gauteng province in South Africa. Random sampling was adopted administering the questionnaire and a total of 60 was retrieved from the construction workers and used for the analysis. The data extracted from the questionnaire was analysed using SPSS V 24, adopting, mean score and frequencies. The study discovered that the workers have low awareness about the adoption of the gig economy as a tool for sustainable livelihood strategy. The adoption is hindered by the corrupt practices within the construction industry and poor collaboration among construction workers. The study contributes to practice through the provision of an effective means for improving the livelihood of workers. The study recommends that collaborative practices should be encouraged and awareness regarding the gig economy should be created in the industry.

Presentation Conference Type Conference Paper (Published)
Conference Name 14th International Postgraduate Research Conference in the Built Environ ment (IPGRC)
Start Date Dec 16, 2019
End Date Dec 17, 2019
Acceptance Date Oct 20, 2019
Publication Date 2019-12
Deposit Date Jun 30, 2022
Pages 224-232
Book Title 14th International Postgraduate Research Conference in the Built Environ ment (IPGRC)
Keywords Construction workers; gig economy; independent contractor; sustainable livelihood
Public URL http://researchrepository.napier.ac.uk/Output/2883741