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Exploring Susceptibility Measures to Persuasion

Vargheese, John Paul; Collinson, Matthew; Masthoff, Judith

Authors

Matthew Collinson

Judith Masthoff



Contributors

Sandra Burri Gram-Hansen
Editor

Tanja Svarre Jonasen
Editor

Cees Midden
Editor

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that indicates how personalising persuasive strategies may increase the effectiveness of persuasive technologies and behaviour change interventions. This has led to a wide range of studies exploring self reported, perceived susceptibility to persuasion, which highlight the role of individual differences. Conducting such studies, while accounting for individual differences can be challenging, particularly where persuasive strategies may be considered similar due to their underlying components. In this paper, we present a study exploring perceived susceptibility to Cialdini's principles of persuasion, with a focus on how we can distinguish perceived susceptibility measures between the most recently identified Unity principle and Social proof. This study was conducted using an online survey incorporating perceived susceptibility measures to all seven Cialdini principles and a measure of the actual effectiveness of seven corresponding persuasive strategies. Our results indicate that while we are able to distinguish perceived susceptibility measures between Unity and Social proof, together with Commitment, Scarcity and Reciprocity, we were unable to obtain these measures for Liking and Authority.

Presentation Conference Type Conference Paper (Published)
Conference Name 15th International Conference on Persuasive Technology
Start Date Apr 20, 2020
End Date Apr 23, 2020
Publication Date 2020
Deposit Date Dec 14, 2022
Publisher Springer
Pages 16-29
Series Title Lecture Notes in Computer Science
Series Number 12064
Series ISSN 1611-3349
Book Title Persuasive Technology. Designing for Future Change
ISBN 978-3-030-45711-2
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-45712-9_2
Keywords Susceptibility, Persuasion, Influence, Personalisation
Public URL http://researchrepository.napier.ac.uk/Output/2965035